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Course Descriptions


182.006 - Introduction to Environmental & Social Justice; ORTG 106, Grann

This class provides an introduction to the theories of the environment, theories of justice in the context of environmental policy and planning, and to histories of poor peoples' struggles around the unequal distribution of toxic waste. We will focus on the ways race, class, gender, sexuality, region, eco-colonialism and their intersections shape environmental and political struggles over natural resource use. Students will learn to examine the ways in which socially constructed representations of Nature shape our interactions with natural environments and shape our perceptions of environmental problems and solutions.


184.005 - Introduction to American Pop Culture; MITCH 220, Tiongson

Popular culture can be defined as the beliefs and practices that characterize a particular culture, as well as the objects, narratives, and rituals through which they are organized and that are widely shared, enjoyed, and understood among a population. It is also greatly understood as the culture of ordinary people, as opposed to highly educated or specialized elites. This course examines many aspects of popular culture, including movies, action figures and other toys, cartoons/comics, advertising, television, and urban legends. This class involves learning how to read popular culture as a text and as an indicator of societal norms, diversions, and diversities.


186.002 - Introduction to Southwest Studies; MITCH 102, Martinez Orozco

This course provides both an introduction to the complex history and culture of the southwestern United States and a demonstration of the possibilities of the interdisciplinary study of regional American culture. It is multicultural in content and multidisciplinary in methodology. The course examines cross-cultural relationships among the peoples of the Southwest within the framework of their expressions and experiences in art, culture, religion, and social and political economy. More specifically, this course will consider: What is this place we call the Southwest? How is it defined geographically, politically, and culturally? Who are the people that live there? How have their lives been transformed by social and historical forces into the cultures we see today? At the same time, how have these same groups retained their traditions, customs, and beliefs in response to change? This course will explore contemporary Southwestern cultures, with their multiple voices and cultural expressions, using an interdisciplinary approach that draws from geography, anthropology, history, literature, and the arts.


200.002 - Comparative Global Societies; Staff

The Chicana & Chicano Studies Department is the home department for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


201.002 - Intro to Chicana & Chicano Studies; MITCH 211, Belmonte

The Chicana & Chicano Studies Department is the home department for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


285.002 - Perspectives in American Studies; MITCH 117, Denetdale

This class will introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies through focused thematic inquiry drawing on two areas of focus in the Department. Specifically, we will examine how a variety of mediums such as photography and oral history have been used to document significant historical moments in American history and to bring in previously marginalized and invisible voices that illuminate the dynamics of race, gender, and class in American life. (Note: this course is required for all American Studies majors and minors.)


303.002 - Law in the Political Community; DSH 233, Ganjei

The Political Science Department is the home department for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


309.001 - Youth, Power & Social Movements; Tiongson

This course examines contemporary youth involvement in social movements through the lens of social movement theory and youth studies. It focuses in particular on youth activism in the post-Civil Rights era. The course explores the circumstances under which youth-based and youth-led social movements emerge as well as the role of youth expressive forms and forms of technology in the formation, development, and political trajectory of these movements. At the same time, the course examines how youth conceive of social justice and social change and how youth go about framing social issues. To accomplish this, we will scrutinize a select number of sites and forums where youth are engaging in activism, including youth involvement in the global justice movement, anti-corporate activism, the prison abolition movement, the immigrant rights movement, and the anti-war movement. Ultimately, the course attempts to draw larger theoretical lessons about the nature of power, social change, and contemporary youth politics.


310.001 - Cultural Studies & Folklore; Trujillo

This course introduces students to cultural studies and the interpretation of folklore. Particular attention will be paid to ballad traditions, "punk" style, tattoos, and lowriders. Course materials and lectures will frequently utilize US Hispanic or Chicana/o cultural traditions to explore key concepts and issues. Additionally, this course will require students to assume an analytical and critical perspective on academic interpretive models. We will read texts that exemplify critical Marxist, feminist, and reflexive anthropological approaches.


310.003 - Writers in the Community; ORTG 123, Contreras

The Chicana and Chicano Studies Department is the home department for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


310.009 - New Mexico Literary Landscapes; MITCH 211, Romero

The Chicana and Chicano Studies Department is the home department for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


330.001 - Queer Theories; Brandzel

The Women Studies Program is the home program for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


330.004 - Politics of Sex; MITCH 221, Brandzel

The politics of sex are around us every day - in our laws, on our televisions and radios, and aired in heated political debates. In this course, we tackle some of the controversies associated with "the politics of sex" by examining how sex, gender and sexuality have been constructed throughout US history, culture and politics. The primary purpose of this class is to study how sexuality is racialized, classed, gendered, etc., with an emphasis on challenging the ways in which certain identities and practices are normalized while others are marked as deviant or unnatural. In studying the relationship between what is considered normal and deviant sexual and/or gendered behavior, we can understand how our society categorizes and makes sense of individuals.


330.008 - Feminist Theories; MITCH 215, Mays

The Women Studies Program is the home program for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


330.009 - Black Women & the Diaspora; CTLB 130, Howard

The Africana Studies Program is the home program for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


330.012 - Raza Genders & Sexualities; Sanchez

The Chicana and Chicano Studies Department is the home department for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


341.001 - Feminist Cinema; Mays (2nd 8 weeks)

The Women Studies Program is the home program for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


350.001 - Feminist Flappers & Harlem Heroines; ORTG 106, Mays

The Women Studies Program is the home program for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


350.002 - The US War on Terror; DSH 334, Lubin

This course examines the history, politics and cultural production of the U.S. War on Terror, a conflict that began following the Cold War and continues today (although officially the war has ended). The War on Terror describes an historical moment in which definitions of U.S. nationalism, legality, and territory are undergoing transformation. We will locate the origins of the War on Terror in 1980s counterinsurgency operations in Latin American, as well as in domestic wars on crime and drugs. We will explore how the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, redefined U.S. engagements in the world, as well as counterinsurgency efforts in the U.S. We will explore the deadly consequences of the War on Terror on so-called enemy combatants in Yemen, Pakistan, and those detained in Guantanamo Bay. Our discussion concludes with a consideration of how the War on Terror has "come home" in the form of increasingly militarized American urban policing. To help draw connections between foreign war and domestic policing and counterinsurgency, we will be reading Dave Egger's novel Zeitoun.


360.003 - Querencia; SHRI 106, Romero

The Chicana and Chicano Studies Department is the home department for this course. Please contact them for a course description.


363.001 - Chicano Latino Film; Melendez

This course examines the history of Latino/a film images and depictions in America from the Silent Period to the present. Special regard is given to films produced by Chicanos/Latinos in the contemporary period. In this regard, the course seeks to understand Latino/a filmmaking as a self-representational medium and as a response and an affirmation of the Latino/a experience in America. In this course we will have the opportunity to screen feature-length films, Chicano/a docudrama and Latino/a independent and experimental films. We will study Chicano/Latino film as a form of cultural representation and communication. Additionally, we will consider such questions as film narration, symbolism and Latino/a subjectivity in film.


385.001 - Theories & Methods of American Studies; MITCH 107, Schreiber

This seminar introduces students to interdisciplinary approaches to the study of American Studies. During the semester, we will examine the history of American Studies, as well as focus on contemporary scholarship in the field. This course explores the political and social meanings of cultural conflict and national identity through close analysis and classroom discussion of various research methodologies that employ primary source material such as historical documents, literature, ethnography, and visual and popular culture. We will focus on how ideas about race, gender, sexuality, class and region have shaped contests over the meaning of citizenship and belonging. The seminar will be framed around the following questions: What is distinct about interdisciplinary scholarship? What kinds of questions do American Studies scholars ask? What does a comparative framework offer in terms of methods?


500.001 - American Culture Studies Seminar; HUM 419, Schreiber

The American Culture Studies (ACS) pro-seminar introduces students to (1) current theories and methods in the field, (2) the history of American Studies nationally and at UNM, and (3) the faculty in the department. It is the required introductory seminar for all American Studies graduate students and is open only to those who have been accepted into the MA or PhD programs. During the course of the term, most (if not all) of the other American Studies faculty members will visit the seminar to introduce themselves and their fields of specialization.


502.001 - Research Methods Practicum; HUM 419, Melendez

This seminar teaches students applied research skills and methods. The primary purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools to develop a thesis or dissertation draft, with a thorough understanding of how to go about locating primary source material and conducting various forms of research that can serve as a foundation for their prospectus. Students complete this seminar having drafted an initial prospectus and with insight into the mechanics of scholarship that will prepare them both to develop their comprehensive exams and to embark on the independent research required to produce an MA thesis or PhD dissertation.


519.001 - Secularism & US Empire; HUM 419, Holscher

From nineteenth century talk of manifest destiny to twenty-first century evangelical interventions in U.S. foreign policy, religious motivations have undergirded American empire. This course recognizes the role of religion in the processes and relationships of U.S. imperialism. We'll focus on the similarly important role of secularism in shaping ideologies, practices, and experiences of empire. Over two centuries, American imperialism has been tied to imaginings, formal and informal, of the United States as a secular nation - a government and culture where "religion" exists apart, as something privatized and optional. These secular imaginings have produced particular ways of talking about "religion" - including discourses about religious freedom and pluralism, and rhetorical distinctions of "good" v. "bad" Islam. This course considers how U.S. formations of "the secular" - and efforts toward defining and regulating "religion" that they incubate - extend into imperial relationships. We'll ask how these co-emergent categories have played into the interlocking modern projects of capitalism and colonialism. We'll pay attention to how "the secular" and "religion" are assembled, historically, from ideas about race, class, gender, and sexuality, and how the state has invoked both to police racial, sexual, etc. identity and behavior. American imperialism extends to distant peoples, and it also bears on "domestic" populations who, by virtue of race, sexuality, immigration or felon status, are governed in ways that produce their marginalization within the body politic. This course examines how secularism - and religion - work in the service of empire, and how these diverse subjects of U.S. empire receive those categories and resist, trouble, or otherwise make them a part of their own lives.


556.001 - Indigenous Gender & Sexualities; HUM 419, Denetdale

This course introduces graduate students to the study of Indigenous gender and sexuality. We survey the extant literature on Indigenous gender and sexuality, including anthropological, literary, and historical studies that have informed contemporary scholarship and community practices to recover, reclaim, and celebrate the presence of Indigenous multiple genders within tribal nations and urban communities. We will also become familiar with major arguments and issues related to Indigenous gender and sexuality, scholarly contributions to the field, and become familiar with local community activists who take on these issues across the geography of tribal nations and urban spaces.


For more information, special technology fees and computer requirements please go to the EU Website.

182.002 - Introduction to Environmental & Social Justice; Iralu

182.003 - Introduction to Environmental & Social Justice; Juhasz-Wood

This class provides an introduction to the theories of the environment, theories of justice in the context of environmental policy and planning, and to histories of poor peoples' struggles around the unequal distribution of toxic waste. We will focus on the ways race, class, gender, sexuality, region, eco-colonialism and their intersections shape environmental and political struggles over natural resource use. Students will learn to examine the ways in which socially constructed representations of Nature shape our interactions with natural environments and shape our perceptions of environmental problems and solutions.


184.001 - Introduction to American Popular Culture; Shell

Popular culture can be defined as the beliefs and practices that characterize a particular culture, as well as the objects, narratives, and rituals through which they are organized and that are widely shared, enjoyed, and understood among a population. It is also generally understood as the culture of ordinary people, as opposed to highly educated or specialized elites. This course examines many aspects of popular culture, including movies, action figures and other toys, cartoons/comics, advertising, television, and urban legends. The class involves learning how to read popular culture as a text and as an indicator of societal norms, diversions, and diversities.


185.005 - Introduction to Race, Class, Ethnicity; Maile

185.006 - Introduction to Race, Class, Ethnicity; Barajas

185.007 - Introduction to Race, Class, Ethnicity; Garcia

This is an interdisciplinary introduction to the issues, and social and cultural formation of race, class and ethnicity in American life and society. The course is designed to foster an appreciation of the heterogeneity of experience in American life. The course is focused on the study of cross-cultural group relations. More specifically, this course will consider: Who are you? For most of us, self-description includes our race, class, and ethnicity, but what do these terms mean? Are these terms fixed and unchanging? This course introduces the terms, race, class and ethnicity and offers a critical discussion of their historical meaning and their meaning in modern society. We will pay attention to cross-cultural and interdisciplinary themes within these definitions.


186.020 - Introduction to Southwest Studies; Ell

186.021 - Introduction to Southwest Studies; Mundt

This course provides both an introduction to the complex history and culture of the southwestern United States and a demonstration of the possibilities of the interdisciplinary study of regional American culture. It is multicultural in content and multidisciplinary in methodology. It examines cross-cultural relationships among the peoples of the Southwest within the framework of their expressions and experiences in art, culture, religion, and social and political economy. More specifically, this course will consider: What is this place we call the Southwest? How is it defined- geographically, politically, and culturally? Who are the people that live there? How have their lives been transformed by social and historical forces into the cultures we see today? At the same time, how have these same groups retained their traditions, customs, and beliefs in response to change? This course will explore contemporary Southwestern cultures, their multiple voices and culture expressions, using an interdisciplinary approach that draws from geography, anthropology, history, literature, and the arts.


330.014 - Transnational Feminisms; Mazumdar

The Women Studies Program is the home program for this course. Please contact them for a course description.

Alex Lubin

Department Chair
Humanities Building - Room 472
Phone: 277-3929


Alyosha Goldstein

Graduate Advisor
Humanities Building - Room 436
Phone: 277-3929


Rebecca Schreiber

Undergraduate Advisor
Humanities Building - Room 426
Phone: 277-3929